#FamilyFriday – Parenting Plans

You’ve heard it, we’ve written about it, and everyone knows it – divorce can get ugly and children are often the first to suffer.  Parenting Plans encourage parents to focus on the needs of their children.

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On this week’s #FamilyFriday article the attorneys at ERA Law Group, LLC want to discuss the importance of Parenting Plans.  You’ve heard it, we’ve written about it, and everyone knows it – divorce can get ugly and children are often the first to suffer.  Parenting Plans encourage parents to focus on the needs of their children, how best to co-parent, and how to anticipate and/or address the various changes in their lives at the time of its creation and in the future.

Frequently parties obtain their divorce, receive their Judgment of Absolute Divorce, and some form of an access schedule, holiday schedule, and child support.  What happens when this changes?  What about claiming the children on your taxes?  What about switching schools?  Sports?  Doctors?  The Judgment of Absolute Divorce is frequently silent on many of these issues which results in continuous litigation.  A well-drafted Parenting Plan can resolve many, if not all, of these issues.  More importantly, it allows parents to come together as parents – not as spouses.  They may no longer be spouses but they will always be parents.

Attorneys and mediators can help you and your family create a Parenting Plan that best suits your family dynamic and situation.  Additionally, attorneys and mediators often know what questions to ask, problems to prepare for, things to consider that many parents in the moment don’t think about.  Most importantly, settling the disputes between the spouses when it comes to them as parents also make the divorce process less painful for children.  Their parents may not be married but their family will have consistency and a plan in place.

Call the attorneys at ERA Law Group, LLC today at (410) 919-1790 and ask about our mediation and parenting plan services!

#FamilyFriday: Marital v. Non-Marital Property

When couples get divorced they are required to identify marital property and non-marital property.  Many individuals don’t know what makes property marital and therefore, how they may unintentionally make a non-marital asset marital. 

When couples get divorced they are required to identify marital property and non-marital property.  Many individuals don’t know what makes property marital and therefore, how they may unintentionally make a non-marital asset marital.  This week’s #FamilyFriday article defines marital and non-marital property and offers a few tips to protect your non-marital property.

Maryland defines marital property as any property – no matter how titled – acquired by 1 or both parties during the marriage.  Individuals mistakenly believe that if the property, personal or real estate, is in their sole name it means that it is not marital – not true.  By virtue of being married, what’s theirs is yours and what’s yours is theirs.

As logic flows, non-marital property is any property which was acquired prior to marriage.  There are also some ways to acquire non-marital property during your marriage.  These include an inheritance, a gift from a third person, an agreement between you and your spouse stating what is or is not marital, or any monies which were received through any of the above means.  For example, if your parent passes and leaves you $10,000.00.  You can put that $10,000.00 into a bank account in your sole name and still have that remain non-marital property.

How does non-marital property then become marital property?  When you comingle the property.  Take the example of receiving a $10,000 inheritance described above.  Say you decide to transfer your inheritance into the joint account.  Many would think that $10,000 of the balance of their joint account would remain non-marital since it was clearly from their inheritance.  Wrong.  The moment those monies were comingled, all of that money became marital property.

So, what do you do?  One of two things: (1) keep non-marital property separate or (2) enter into a prenuptial or postnuptial agreement and define what each of you will maintain as non-marital property.  You and your spouse can enter an agreement and list what property will be marital and what will not.  That may include real estate, jewelry, bank accounts, etc.  Or, you can keep it simple and keep your non-marital money separate.

Call ERA Law Group, LLC today at (410) 919-1790 to learn how to protect your non-marital property!

#TuesdayTips – Filing for Guardianship

When a person is no longer able to appropriately care for themselves or manage their property, it is important to ensure that they are protected.  

Many people find themselves in a precarious situation when their spouse, parent, sibling, friend, etc. are no longer able to feed themselves regularly, pay their bills, see the doctor, and generally not take care of their person or finances.  When a person is no longer able to appropriately care for themselves or manage their property, it is important to ensure that they are protected.  When a person will not or cannot voluntarily seek assistance on their own, you may have to request the Court to intervene in order to ensure their safety.  On this week’s #TuesdayTips article, the attorneys at ERA Law Group, LLC want to discuss the process of filing for Guardianship.

When filing a Petition for Guardianship of the Person and/or Property, the Petitioner is seeking the Court to declare the alleged disabled person incompetent and therefore unable to care for themselves and/or manage their property/finances.  This would let the Petitioner, when appointed Guardian, to act on behalf of the alleged disabled person and make sure they are taken care of physically and financially.

The steps to file the Petition can be confusing as the Petition requires specific information and documents for filing.  For example:

  1. The Petition requires various information about the alleged disabled person, including but not limited to their finances, the purpose of the filing, the diagnosis, etc.
  2. The Petition requires time sensitive certificates related to the alleged disabled person’s disability from two medical providers.
  3. After filing, the Court will appoint the alleged disabled person an attorney to represent them in the proceeding. The attorney will meet and speak with the alleged disabled person and contact anyone else, including the Petitioner, that s/he feels is necessary.
  4. The Petitioners will also be required to notify certain people and facilities that would need to be made aware of the Petition.
  5. Finally, there will be a hearing to decide whether the findings are such that the Court will declare the person incompetent and appoint a Guardian, presumably the Petitioner.

In most cases this process is painless.  In the other cases the process can be litigious and emotionally challenging for the Petitioner, the family, and the alleged disabled person.  In either case, it would be in your best interests to speak with an attorney to make sure the Guardianship process is completed effectively and accurately.  In the event you oppose the Petition, it’s important to make sure your opportunity to object does not expire and your objections are appropriately identified.

The health, safety, and well-being of your friend or family member is of utmost importance.  Call the attorneys at ERA Law Group, LLC today to help navigate you through this process.