#FamilyFriday: Nesting Agreements

It is difficult to imagine your children living somewhere other than their home.  There is an alternative!

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Children and finances are two driving factors in a divorce.  How will your children handle the idea of their parents separating and how will your bank accounts suffer?  Finding a separate living space, especially one that can accommodate your children, during your divorce is difficult.  It is difficult to imagine your children living somewhere other than their home.  There is an alternative!  In this week’s #FamilyFriday article, ERA Law Group, LLC discusses an alternative approach called Nesting Agreements.

While parents are divorcing and sorting their finances, one alternative approach is to develop a nesting agreement.  Nesting agreements allow the children to always remain in their home while the parents take turns residing there.  For example, perhaps parent 1 resides in the home Monday from school pick up through Thursday school drop off and parent 2 resides in the home from Thursday school pick up through Monday school drop off.

During this nesting time, the parties can agree to maintain a joint account that each contribute to for paying household bills.  Perhaps the parents can stay at a family member’s home during the time they are not with the children or get a small 1-bedroom apartment in the interim.  It allows couples to work through the nitty gritty of their divorce while keeping stability for their children.

An important consideration is how well you and the other parent can communicate and co-parent.  At times, the feelings or circumstances involving the divorce don’t allow for that to happen effectively.  In those situations, a nesting agreement would not be beneficial.

If you’d like to consider a nesting agreement or some other alternative approach to separation and sharing custody, contact ERA Law Group, LLC today at (410) 919-1790 to learn more!

#FamilyFriday: What is the “Best Interests of the Child” Standard?

After families separate, parents must decide where their children will live and what schedule the children will have with the other parent. To make this determination, the Court uses the “Best Interests of the Child” standard.

After families separate, parents must decide where their children will live, or custody, and what schedule the children will have with the other parent, or visitation.  Some families can settle this among themselves while others require Court intervention.  Often parents assume the Court will award custody to the mother however, that’s not necessarily the case.  In this week’s #FamilyFriday article, ERA Law Group, LLC explains the “Best Interests of the Child” standard used by the Court in determining custody.

Put simply, the Best Interests of the Child standard simply means that the Court looks at certain factors to determine what is in the best interest of the children involved in the family situation.  Even when parents have an agreement, the Court still must make a finding that the agreement is in the best interest of the child.  Often parents become disgruntled because they believe they are in the best position to decide what is in the best interest of their children.  Unfortunately, family litigation often results in both parents with opposing opinions about what is in the best interest of their children and the Court must step in to make its determination.

The Court may consider a number of factors in its analysis.  Most commonly the Court focuses on the following factors:

  1. Primary Care Giver – Who is the person who takes care of the child? Who handles the child’s day-to-day activities?
  2. Fitness – What are the psychological and physical capacities of the parties seeking custody? Was there evidence of abuse – physical, emotional, or otherwise?
  3. Character and Reputation
  4. Agreements – Is there a custody agreement already in place?
  5. Ability to Maintain Family Relationships – Who will be best able to help the child keep family relationships, including relationships with the other parent’s family?
  6. Child Preference– Does the child have a preference?  Some courts will interview the children  outside of the presence of their parents.  The older the children involved the more weight is given to their preference.
  7. Material Opportunity – Which parent has the financial resources to give the child more things?
  8. Age, Health and Gender of Child
  9. Residences of Parents and Opportunity for Visitation – How close do the parents live to each other, extended family, school, etc?
  10. Length of Separation– How long has the parent been separated from the child?
  11. Any Prior Abandonment or Surrender of Custody – Is there a history of one parent walking out and leaving the other parent to cope with the child and the home?
  12. Religious Views – These will be important in the court’s decision only if you can show that religious views affect the physical or emotional well-being of the child. There is no consideration made for non-religious families.
  13. Disability – A party’s disability is only relevant to a custody decision if the disability affects the best interest of the child.

In addition to the above factors, the Court may also consider: Willingness to share custody; Fitness of parents; Child’s relationships with each parent; Ability to stabilize child’s school and social life; Employment considerations (e.g. long hours, extensive travel, etc.); Age and number of children; Financial status; Benefit to parent; Sincerity of parent’s request for custody.

Call ERA Law Group, LLC today at (410) 919-1790 to schedule your FREE 30 minute consultation!  Ask about our legal services including: mediation, marital separation agreements, and parenting plans!

#FamilyFriday: Co-Parenting Resources

Figuring out how to co-parent after a breakup, separation, or divorce is difficult.  When parents don’t communicate well, that makes it even harder. 

Figuring out how to co-parent after a breakup, separation, or divorce is difficult.  When parents don’t communicate well, that makes it even harder.  On this week’s #FamilyFriday article, ERA Law Group, LLC want to help parents by identifying various resources available to help them Co-Parent.

Some parents find difficulty in communicating with one another.  At times the communication is simple and other times, it is rather difficult.  Nonetheless, both must parent their children.  Removing face-to-face conversation is sometimes the best place to start when trying to co-parent effectively.  The below programs and apps provide various resources for the separated and divorced parents.

  1. Our Family Wizard

Our Family Wizard is an online program which provides a platform for communication.  The parents can “email” back and forth, add items to a joint calendar, and, most importantly, if their dispute needs to be taken to Court, the correspondence can be tracked by the Court.  This also serves as a means to encourage parents to speak with each other in a respectful manner and keep it about the children.  There is an annual cost of approximately $100.00 per parent.  This is a web-based program though there is an app for iOS and Android.

  1. 2Houses

Similar to Our Family Wizard, this program offers a mutual calendar, financial tab, and photo album tab.  It does not allow for direct communication but there is a journal function which allows parents to make notes.  The financial tab is particularly helpful as it outlines each parents expenses and each parent can upload what expenses they have paid on behalf of the child.  There is no cost to this program.  This is a web-based program though there is an app for iOS.

  1. Kidganizer

Like the former two programs, this is also a means for both parents to keep information related to their children in one central location.  It does not permit the parents a platform for direct communication such as Our Family Wizard, but there is an alert system to alert each parent regarding important events like doctor appointments or parent-teacher conferences.  This is an iOS only app program and costs $1.99.

  1. Custody Junction

Custody Junction provides a Scheduling Center which allows parents to schedule their visitation/events/vacations, etc. up to 2 years in advance.  It also has a Tracking Center which allows parents to track when events were created, edited, amended, what the expenses were, who was present at each event, etc.  It gets rid of the “he said, she said” regarding who, what, where, and when.  Similar to 2Houses, it also has a Reporting Center which provides for accumulated expenses as well as reporting about child support payments, denied or forfeited parenting time, etc.  This program is only web-based and costs $47.00 per parent for a 1 year subscription.

  1. Appclose

AppClose is a combination of the above 4 programs.  It has a joint calendar, a messenger option like texting, an expense forum that acts like Venmo by requesting reimbursement from the other parent as well as the ability to track expenses, the ability to create a parenting schedule, set important reminders, and keep track of family information such as immunizations, date of births, etc.  Much like Facebook, it also has a NewsFeed function which displays all communications, events, etc. at a glance.   This is a free app only program available for iOS and Android.

  1. SKEDi

This program is a family calendar of sorts.  It syncs your calendars so that each parent and/or child knows everyone’s schedule.  It also has the capability of being shared with caregivers and babysitters if necessary.  This is an iOS only app program and costs $9.99.

If you are in need of co-parenting assistance, call ERA Law Group, LLC today at (410) 919-1790 for your free 30-minute consultation!

#FamilyFriday – What Changes in Maryland Family Law Can We Expect to See in 2018?

The 2018 Legislative Session began on January 10, 2018 and brings with it some possible changes to Maryland Family Law.

On this week’s #FamilyFriday article, the attorneys of ERA Law Group, LLC want to bring to your attention some possible changes in Maryland Family Law!  The 2018 Legislative Session began on January 10, 2018 and brings with it some possible changes to Maryland Family Law.

Divorce – Mutual Consent

As we’ve discussed in previous blogs, divorce by mutual consent allows spouses to divorce within one (1) year of their separation and is available only to those married couples that have settled all marital issues and do not have any children in common.  Now, for the third time, there is an attempt to allow spouses with minor children in common to obtain a divorce by mutual consent.

Child Support – Driver’s License Suspension

Parents who fail to pay child support could potentially suffer serious consequences such as having their license suspended.  In this session there is an attempt to exempt individuals from having their license suspended if their income is at or below 200% of the federal poverty level.

Child Support – Income

When determining child support, it is only the actual gross income of the parents that are considered.  Even if one of the parent’s is re-married their spouse’s income is not factored into the child support equation.  In this session there is an attempt to allow a Court to consider a parent’s spouse’s income when determining that parent’s child support obligation.  Additionally, under the same considerations, the Court may order payment of attorney fees in proportion of each parties’ adjusted actual incomes.

Visitation and Child Custody – Terms

Currently the term used for describing the time awarded to the non-custodial parent is “visitation.”  Additionally, the term used to describe decision making authority is “child custody.”  In this session there is an attempt to replace the word “visitation” with “parenting time” and the term “child custody” with “legal decision making.”

If you have a family law related issue or question, call the attorneys of ERA Law Group, LLC today at (410) 919-1790!

#FamilyFriday – My Kids Don’t Want to Follow the Visitation Schedule

Children are not involved in the process of establishing custody, visitation, and support.  So, what happens when they don’t like the outcome?  On this week’s #FamilyFriday article the attorneys of ERA Law Group discuss what a parent’s role is when their children refuse to go to visitation.

The parents have filed suit, went to mediation, attended trial, or settled their issues as they relate to child custody, visitation, and support.  As a result, the parents have a visitation and holiday schedule, established modes of communication, and settled on child support.  The parents are satisfied or as best as they can be in the situation.  Anything missing?  The children.  Children are not involved in the process of establishing custody, visitation, and support.  So, what happens when they don’t like the outcome?  On this week’s #FamilyFriday article the attorneys of ERA Law Group discuss what a parent’s role is when their children refuse to go to visitation.

When determining custody, the Court’s are provided with many factors to consider when making their decision.  One of those factors is – what do the children want?  However, Judges are hesitant to permit a child to come to Court.  On the rare occasion and generally when the child is mature enough to handle the situation, Judges will speak with the child in chambers without the presence of his or her parents.  Even in those situations where the child does have an opportunity to express their desires, Judges may ultimately make a determination as to visitation that does not coincide with the child’s preferences.  Or, in less litigious circumstances, parents will settle their disagreements and make a visitation schedule that is best for themselves and what they believe is in the best interest of their children.  Again, the children may not agree.

When I get the call from a parent stating that their children don’t want to go attend visitation, it often goes like this:

Parent:  “My child refuses to see their parent during the scheduled time, what do I do?”

Answer: “Until your child is 18, it is not up to your children.  You, as their parent, must make sure that they adhere to the visitation schedule.”

Parent: “But, s/he is 17 and literally refuses.  How am I physically supposed to make them?”

And, that is the problem.  No, it is not expected that you physically force your children out the door but it is expected that you encourage them to attend, not create a barrier for them to attend, and, most importantly, not applaud your child’s refusal to attend.  Be sure to discuss the issue with the other parent and discuss possible resolutions.  Be sure to keep the lines of communication open between your child and the other parent so that the child communicates his/her desires to both of you equally.

If you find yourself and children in this situation, call the attorneys at ERA Law Group, LLC and ask what options you may have available.  Perhaps it is time to modify the current arrangement or explore other options.  Call us today for a FREE 30 MINUTE CONSULTATION at (410) 919-1790.

#TuesdayTips – New Guardianship Rules

eing declared incompetent is not something Maryland Judges take lightly.  In fact, in order to provide even more protection to these vulnerable adults, members of the Maryland Guardianship Work Group worked actively to change certain rules.

 

As of January 1, 2018, rules related to Court-Appointed Guardians, Guardianship’s, and Attorneys changed.  In this week’s #TuesdayTips article, the attorneys of ERA Law Group remind our readers the purpose of a Guardianship and what rules have changed.

Many people find themselves in a precarious situation when their spouse, parent, sibling, friend, etc. are no longer able to feed themselves regularly, pay their bills, see the doctor, and just generally not take care of their person or finances.  When a person is no longer able to appropriately care for themselves or manage their property, it is important to ensure that they are protected.  To do so, a Petition for Guardianship of the Person, Property, or both is filed with the Court.

When filing a Petition for Guardianship of the Person and/or Property, the Petitioner is seeking the Court to declare the alleged disabled person incompetent and therefore unable to care for themselves and/or manage their property/finances.  This would let the Petitioner, when appointed Guardian, to act on behalf of the alleged disabled person and make sure they are taken care of physically and financially.

The Petition itself requires various information about the alleged disabled person, including but not limited to their finances, the purpose of the filing, the diagnosis, etc.  Attached as exhibits, the Petition also requires two certificates completed by two different medical providers who have evaluated the alleged disabled person.  After filing, the Court will appoint the alleged disabled person an attorney to represent them in the proceeding.  The Petitioners will also be required to notify certain people and facilities that would need to be made aware of the Petition.  Finally, there will be a hearing to decide whether the findings are such that the Court will declare the person incompetent and appoint a Guardian, presumably the Petitioner.

Being declared incompetent is not something Maryland Judges take lightly.  In fact, in order to provide even more protection to these vulnerable adults, members of the Maryland Guardianship Work Group worked actively to change certain rules.

As of January 1, 2018, the following changes were made:

  1. There are new certificate requirements to be completed depending on whether the medical provider is a physician, psychologist, or licensed certified clinical social worker.
  2. There are now training and eligibility requirements for Court Appointed Attorneys for alleged disabled persons.
  3. Appointed Guardians are now required to undergo an orientation and training so that they have knowledge of their new roles as Guardians of the Person and/or Property of the disabled person.
  4. Additional factors for the Court to consider when determining whether to appoint someone a Guardian who has been convicted of a serious offense or when to require a Guardian to post a bond.

The health, safety, and wellbeing of your friend or family member is of utmost importance.  Call the attorneys at ERA Law Group, LLC today to help navigate you through this process.

#FamilyFriday – What is Discovery?

Discovery is a process used to provide each party an opportunity to obtain evidence related to the opposing party’s case.

Discovery is a process used to provide each party an opportunity to obtain evidence related to the opposing party’s case.  In this week’s #FamilyFriday article, the attorneys of ERA Law Group, LLC want to describe the process, its purpose, and what you should expect.

Discovery usually takes place shortly after the Plaintiff files their complaint.  Maryland Rules allow for different forms of discovery.  The two most common forms of discovery are Requests for Answers to Interrogatories and Requests for Production of Documents.

A Request for Answers to Interrogatories is a series of questions that one party serves on another party to be answered.  Maryland Rule allows for a maximum of 30 questions to be served.  There are standard questions involving your income, assets, personal information, etc. and then there are custom questions that will specifically relate to the issue at hand.  For example, in a custody dispute there may be a specific question about why one parent refused visitation on certain dates.

A Request for Production of Documents is a series of requests for specific documents that one party serves on another party.  In responding to the request you simply state whether you have the document or will produce the document.  In accordance with those responses, you then provide the documents.  There is no limit to how many document requests you may ask.  Many of these requests are also standard and ask for documents such as your bank statements, communications between the parties, etc.  You may also ask for specific questions.  For example, if you’ve learned your spouse was cheating on you with another person, you may ask for copies of all communications with that specific person.

Each party has a right to object to any interrogatory or document request, however, there must be a basis for the objection and that reason must be stated.  For example, in any case involving children, a parties income is going to be relevant and necessary for the purpose of establishing child support.  If in this example you ask for paystubs and the other party objects, you will need to take the necessary steps to compel that party to provide their paystub.  Generally this first involves a letter demanding the production then a Motion to Compel if the production does not occur.

We often hear clients complain and say that discovery is a “waste of time” or that “s/he already knows this information” or “why do I have to answer this?”  The response to all of this information is simple; discovery is important.  Discovery allows your attorney to see what sort of items the other party is focusing on and perhaps get a glimpse into their strategy.  Interrogatories are also signed under oath and provide an opportunity to get a sworn statement of sorts from the opposing party.  Additionally, once everything is on the table it sometimes becomes easier to have a more honest settlement discussion.

If you have been served with discovery, don’t wait.  The rules only allow for 30 days to respond.  Instead, call the attorneys at ERA Law Group, LLC at (410) 919-1790 and ask how we can help you!